Heat Illness Warning Signs

Heat Exhaustion Heat Stroke 
Headache Red, Hot, Dry Skin
Dizziness/Fainting High Temperature
Weakness Confusion
Cramps Seizure/Convulsions
Sweaty/Wet Skin Fainting
Irritability or Confusion  
Thirst  
Nausea/Vomiting  
Fast Heartbeat  

 

What To Do If You Think a Co-Worker is in Danger

  1. Call a supervisor for help. If a supervisor is not available, call 911.
         – Be prepared to describe the symptoms.
         – Give specific and clear directions to your work site.
  2. Have someone stay with the worker and start providing first aid until help arrives.
  3. Move the person to a cooler/shaded area.
  4. Loosen or remove clothing.
  5. Fan and mist the worker with water. Apply ice packs or cold towels.
  6. Provide cool drinking water if the worker is conscious, not vomiting and able to drink.

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